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Tourist Route – Station 6

Stations
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12

Google Maps Co-ordinates -34.180869543262965, 22.155335233352186

Tour Guide Tips and Information: Station 6

Read the Ocean Source of Food Story on the pedestal or below.

Station 6 is located at Beacon Point. The area derives it’s name because it was used extensively to guide ships into the harbour and launch rescue missions where ships got into trouble. Today the area is used to stroll next to coast and enjoy nature. Be on the lookout for whales, dolphins, seals and other sea life in the area. You will probably also find fishermen trying their luck for dinner in the area. This is a part of the route where you should walk slowly and enjoy the moment.

THE OCEAN: SOURCE OF FOOD

Fish, oysters, mussels, crabs, octopi and many more are all are down there…. The sea at Mossel Bay has been a food basket for the earliest people right through to today. The First People devised traps to collect and catch their daily supply of seafood, while later generations from earlier centuries caught their fish with hand lines along the coast or from small boats. Fish were hung out to dry at every home.

Fishermen regularly visited their favourite rocky outcrops and spots, and aptly named them after local characters and topography such as Beneke se Klip, Skurwe Bankies, Klopper se Gat, Romansbank, Die Leer, Bamboesgat, Man op die Rots, Rooiwalle, Bok se Bak and Gericke se Klip.

On their respective visits to Mossel Bay, the Prince of Wales in 1925 and Prince George in 1934, praised the quality of the oysters. Families relied on the bounty of fish for their daily food. If a fisherman walked home with a rod and an empty bag, a neighbour would whisper: “No frying in the pan tonight…”

The fishing industry grew steadily and was a dominant force in the development of the harbour. In the second half of the 19th century, provision had to be made for the berthing of small boats. The port was extended from a mere jetty with the building of quays 1 and 2. Quay 3 soon followed and was fully utilised in 1955 and, in 1959, extended to 117m. In 1982 the Vintcent Jetty was built with white-fish processing facilities provided at both sides of the quay. Records from 1990 state that there were 8 fishing companies and 36 trawlers that used Mossel Bay as their home harbour.

Today the fishing industry has diminished due to fish stock limitation. Local residents frequently spotted, however, trying their luck in catching something for the pot in small boats, at favourite anchor spots or angling from a rocky outcrop. Please visit our local restaurants to sample what the ocean in the Mossel Bay area has to offer.

To the next station

Proceed east to Station 7 (620 m) on the paved walkway, down the zigzag wooden ramp and along the seawall. Lookout for smaller sea life, like crabs and starfish along the seawall. Follow the pathway which makes a 90 degree turn through a lawn area where you can have a picnic next to the sea. Make use of the tidal pool and seaside beach area with all the beach amenities the Point Area has to offer. Walk along the pathway until you get to a parking area, turn left and proceed south along the shoreline to Station 7. You have arrived at the Mossel Bay Point, one of the main tourist areas in town with numerous things to see and do.
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